Information about Conagher

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Conagher
Irish Form of Name:
Conachar
Translation:
a rabbit warren
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Conagher
Conachar
Cunnagher By. S. S. Map
Cunnagher Larkin’s Co. Map of Galway
Conougher Tithe Compn. Book
Connagher (as in 1785) Vestry Book
Conoher (as in 1822) Vestry Book
Conougher (1827) Vestry Book
Description:
The property of Major Patt. Kerwin, Dublin. It contains 813½ acres statute measure including about 250 acres of bog. There is a Trig Station in this townland called Cunnagher, also an ancient fort.
Situation:
In the N. end of the parish, bounded on the N. and S. by the parish of Addragoole, on the W. by the townland of Stripe, and on the E. by the townlands of Cloonfain and Currraughhaun.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Conagher in several counties; Conadhchair, a place of firewood. The termination char added to conadh [conna], firewood : p. 12, I [reproduced below].
We have a great many ordinary Irish terminations, for the most part denoting the same as the English terminations ous and ly, namely "abounding in", "full of". The chief ordinary Irish terminations are ach, lach, nach, rach, trach, tach, seach, chair. For all these and others, see vol. ii. p. 3 [the part pertaining to char follows]. Char or chor. This postfix conveys a cumulative sense, which is well seen in Bennchor, a collection of peaks or gables, from beann, a peak (see Banagher, 1st Vol.). Exactly similar in formation to this, is Cranagher, in the parish of Clooney in Clare, which is anglicised from Crannchar, as Banagher from Bennchor, and signifies a place of cranns or trees. So also from grean [gran] gravel, we have granagher, a gravelly place, which forms again Gortnagranagher in Mayo and Limerick, the gravelly field (gort). There is a small river in the county Leitrim, flowing from Belhavel lake into the north-west corner of Lough Allen; it was formerly called the Duff, but it is now known by the equivalent name, Diffagher, which very well represents the sound of Duibheachair (ea, vowel sound, inserted), black river, from dubh, black. The celebrated plague called the yellow sickness, which swept over the British Islands and the Continent in the seventh century, is sometimes called buidheachair in the Irish annals. This word is reproduced in the name of Cloonboygher near Carrigallen in Leitrim; but here it is probable that the term was applied to the yellow colour of the water or of the mud; and that the name means the meadow of the yellowish water (buidhe, yellow).

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
813 0 33
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
389 3 10
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
7 2 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
392 14 10
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Conagher is a townland.

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Conagher
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Conagher
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Conagher is in the civil parish of Dunmore Parish.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Dunmore
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Dunmore
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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