Information about Caltrapallis

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Caltrapallis
Irish Form of Name:
Cealtra Phaílís
Translation:
old burial place of the fairy palace
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Caltrapallis
Cealtra Phaílís
Caltra Pallis
Caltra Pallis B.S. Sketch Map
Pallis Co. Alph. List
Caltra Pallis Cornelius O’Kelly, Esq.
Pallis Inq. Temp. Car. I
Caltrughnepallice Inq. Temp. Car. I
Calltronpallice Inq. Temp. Car. I
Pallice Inq. Temp. Gul.
Caltraghnapallice Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Pallas Larkin’s Co. Map
Caltra Pallis Manus Ward, Esq.
Caltra Pallis Michl. D. Bellew, Esq.
Caltra Pallis Michl. Shaughnessy, Esq.
Description:
Is the property of Michl. D. Bellew held by deed for ever. It contains a.r.p. all of which is under good cultivation. Houses are in middling repair, but the roads are in very good repair. Pays for County Cess £2. 1s. 8d.
Situation:
Lies in the southern part of this parish in the barony of Tiaquin, is bounded by Creggaunagroagh, Kinclare and Caltra townlands in same barony and by Lisslea in the barony of Kilconnel.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Caltraghpallas in Galway ; churchyard of the fairyfort. For Caltrach and Polos, see vol. i. p. 316 , and vol. ii. p. 232 [reproduced below].
Cealtrach [caltragh], which is also a derivative from cill, is used - chiefly in the western half of Ireland - to denote an old burying-ground. It is commonly anglicised Caltragh, which is the name of a great many places; and there is a village in Galway called Caltra, another modification of the same word. We find Cloonacaltry in Sligo and Roscommon, the cloon or meadow of the burying-ground. Cealdrach [caldragh], another Irish form, gives name to eight townlands, now called Caldragh, which are confined to six counties, with Leitrim as centre; in one case it is made Keeldra in the last county. Fairy palace. Palas or pailis signifies a palace or royal residence, a loan word from the Latin (palatium). We have it pretty often reproduced in names, and it is always applied to a circular fort or lis; but as modern stone castles sometimes came to be erected on or near the sites of the forts, the name naturally descended to them, though this is not the original application of the word. Moreover in later times, after the abandonment of the old lisses as residences by their human inhabitants, and since the fairies have taken possession of them, the word pailis is generally understoon to mean a fairy palace or residence. There are between twenty and thirty townlands called Pallas, Palace, and Pallis, three anglicised forms of the word; and all these places took their names from fairy forts or lisses. Pallaskenry in Limerick was so called as being situated in the old territory of Kenry or Caonraighe. In Sligo, the term is found in the form of Phaleesh, which is the name of a townland; and in the end of names the p is occasionally changed to f by aspiration, as in Cappafaulish in Kilkenny, the garden-plot of the fairy fort. The name of Caltrapallas, in Galway (the Caltragh or burial ground of the fairy palace) shows that an old fairy fort was adopted as a burial-place, which has been done elsewhere in Ireland.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
40 0 25
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Caltrapallis is a townland.
Other placesnames in this townland:
Some other placenames in or near this townland are...

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Caltrapallis
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Caltrapallis
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Caltrapallis is in the civil parish of Killosolan.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Ahascragh & Caltra
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Killosolan
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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