Information about Ballynaheskeragh

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Ballynaheskeragh
Irish Form of Name:
Baile na heiscreach
Translation:
town of the ridge (or sand hills)
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Ballinaheskera
Ballynaheskeragh
Baile na heiscreach
Ballynehiskeragh Inq. Temp. Gul. III
[blank] Boundary Sketch Map
Ballinaheskeragh Co. Book
[blank] Co. Map
Ballynahesgragh Geo. D. H. Kirkaldy, Esq.
[blank] H. C. Sur. & Val. Report
Ballyyneheskeragh Inq. Temp. Car. I
Ballanyscraigh Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Ballyneheskeragh Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Ballynahisera Rev. Francis Coghlan
Description:
This townland contains a number of farm houses, several lime kilns, a Trigl. A large portion of fir planting in belts, and a small portion of bog. The road from Killimor to Portumna runs through the townland.
Situation:
Bounded on the North by Hoathlawn, on the West by Derradda South, South by Sheeanrush, Cooldoragha, Gurthluskin and Coolpayna, all in the parish of Liskmolassy, West by Lismeehul and Treenanurla.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Ballynaheskeragh in Galway ; Baile-na-heiscreach, the town of the esker or sand-ridge. For eiscir, see vol. i. p. 402 [reproduced below].
Eiscir [esker] means a ridge of high land, but it is generally applied to a sandy ridge, or a line of low sand-hills. It enters pretty extensively into local names, but it is more frequently met with across the middle of Ireland than in either the north or south. It usually takes the form of Esker, which by itself is the name of more than thirty townlands, and combines to form the names of many others; the word is somewhat altered in Garrisker, the name of a place in Kildare, signifying short sand-ridge. The most celebrated esker in Ireland is Esker-Riada, a line of gravel-hills extending with little interruption across Ireland, from Dublin to Clarin-Bridge in Galway, which was fixed upon as the boundary between the north and south halves of Ireland, when the country was divided, in the second century, between Owen More and Conn of the Hundred Battles (see p. 134). As a termination, this word assumes other forms, all derived from the genitive eiscreach [eskera]. Clashaniskera in Tipperary is called in Irish Clais-an-eiscreach, the trench or pit of the sand-hill. Ahascragh in Galway signifies the ford of the esker; but its full name as given by the Four Masters is Ath-eascrach Cluain [Ahascra Cuan], the ford of St. Cuan's sand-hill; and they still retain the memory of St. Cuan, the patron who is commemorated in O'Clery's Calendar at the 15th of October; Tiranascragh, the name of a townland and parish in Galway, the land of the esker. Eskeragh and Eskragh are the names of several townlands in the Ulster and Connaught counties, the Irish Eiscreach signifying a place full of eskers or sand-hills.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
431 0 17
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
158 1 2
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
158 1 2
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Ballynaheskeragh is a townland.

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Ballynaheskeragh
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Ballynaheskeragh
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Ballynaheskeragh is in the civil parish of Killimor Bologue.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Killimor & Tiranascragh
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Killimorbologue
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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