Information about Bunnasillagh

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Bunnasillagh
Irish Form of Name:
Bun na Saileach
Translation:
bottom of the sallows
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Bunnasillagh
Bun na Saileach
Bunnasillaugh By. Surveyors Sketch Map
Monasillagh County Cess Collector
Monesellaghe Inq. Temp. Eliz.
Monisillagh Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Meinsillagh Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Bunnasellegh Local
Bunnasellegh Mearsman
Bunnasellagh Rev. John Molloy, P.P.
Bunnacella Tithe Ledger
Description:
The property William Nesbet, Esq., Dublin. Agent Mr. Cornwall of Dublin all held by John O’Flaherty, Esq. of Lisdunna as a stock farm at about 30 shillings per acre. Antiquities 4 forts. Religion all Roman Catholics. All held under lease. Co. Cess 14d. paid per acre half yearly. Antiquities 4 forts.
Situation:
A central townland bounded on the North by the townlands of Killimannagh, and Abbeytown, West by Lisclunna, South by Lough - and Ultore and on the East by Raheen. In the Barony of Clare and County of Galway.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Bunnasillagh in Galway; Bun-na-saileach, the bottom land of the sally-trees. For saileach, see vol. ii. p. 356 (reproduced below).
Sallow. If the Irish distinguished, in their tongue, the different species of sallow one from another, these distinctions do not appear in that part of the language that has subsided into local names; for the word sáil [saul] is used to designate all the different kinds - cognate with Lat. Salix and with Manx shell, and Welsh helyg, willows. Soligohod, now a parish in Tipperary, derives its name from this tree; and for this etymology we have the authority of Cormac Mac Cullenan. He states in his Glossary that Salchoit, as he writes the name, comes from sal, the sallow, and coit, a Welsh word for wood; and he further tells us that a large wood of sallows grew there; but of this there is not a trace remaining. This word has a great variety of derviatives, and all give names to places in various parts of the country. The simple word sáil is seldom heard, the adjective form sáileach and the diminutivesáileóg being now universally used to designate the plant. The former is anglicised sillagh, silla, and sallagh in the end of names, and the latter silloge and silloga. Both are exemplified in Corsillagh near Newtown Mountkennedy in Wicklow, and Corsilloga in the parish of Agnamullen in Monaghan, each signifying the round hill of the sallows. Lisnasallagh, the fort of the sallows, is the name of two townlands in Cork, and of one near Saintfield in Down; while the same name is found in Roscommon in the form Lisnasillagh : Currasilla in Tipperary and Kilkenny, the curragh or marsh of the osiers. There are several diminutives, from one of which, Sylaun (a place of sallows), the name of some places in Galway is derived.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
237 0 38
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
120 0 0
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
120 0 0
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Bunnasillagh is a townland.
Other placesnames in this townland:
Some other placenames in or near this townland are...

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Bunnasillagh
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Bunnasillagh
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Bunnasillagh is in the civil parish of Donaghpatrick.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Donagh Patrick
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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