Information about Ballynamucka

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Ballynamucka
Irish Form of Name:
Baile na Muice
Translation:
town of the pig
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Baile na Muice
Ballynamucka Boundary Sketch
Ballynamucka Burton Persse, Esq.
Ballinamucka Larkin's Co. Map
Description:
This is a long and narrow townland containing a portion of bog in its Southern part. Remainder arable. It contains nothing remarkable.
Situation:
W. of the centre of the parish, Barony of Dunkellin, is bounded by the townlands of [unable to read]. In this Parish and Barony of Loughrea.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Ballynamucka in Galway, and Ballynamucky in Limerick ; Baile-na-muice, the town of the pig. See Ballynamuck and Slieve-na-muck, vol. i. p. 478 [reproduced below].
The pig. If Ireland has obtained some celebrity in modern times for its abundance of pigs, the great numbers of local names in which the animal is commemorated show that they abounded no less in the days of our ancestors. The Irish language has several words for a pig, but the most usual is muc, which corresponds with the Welsh moch, and Cornish moh. The general anglicised form of the word is muck; and -namuck is a termination of frequent occurrence, signifying "of the pigs or pig". There is a well-known hill near the Galties in Tipperary, called Slievenamuck, the mountain of the pig. Ballynamuck, a usual townland name, signifies pig-town; Tinamuck in King's County, a house (tigh) for pigs. In Lough Derg on the Shannon, is a small island, much celebrated for an ecclesiastical establishment; it is called in the annals, Muic-inis, hog island, or Muic-inis-Riagaill, from St. Riagal or Regulus, a contemporary of St. Columkille. This name would be anglicised Muckinish, and there are several other islands of the name in different parts of Ireland. In early times when woods of oak and beech abounded in this country, it was customary for kings and chieftains to keep great herds of swine, which fed in the woods on masts, and were tended by swine-herds. St. Patrick, it is well known, was a swine-herd in his youth to Milcho, king of Dalaradia; and numerous examples might be quoted from our ancient histories and poems, to show the prevalence of this custom. There are several words in Irish to denote a place where swine were fed, or where they resorted or slept; the most common of which is muclach, which is much used in the formation of names. Mucklagh, its most usual form, is the name of many places in Leinster, Ulster, and Connaught; and scattered over the same provinces there are about twenty-eight townlands called Cornamucklagh, the round-hill of the piggeries. Muiceannach [muckanagh] also signifies a swine haunt, and it gives names to about nineteen townlands in the four provinces, now called Muckanagh, Muckenagh, and Mucknagh, Muckelty, Mucker, Muckera, and Muckery, all townland names, signify still the same thing - a place frequented by swine for feeding or sleeping.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
68 0 20
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
28 0 8
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
28 0 8
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Ballynamucka is a townland.

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Ballynamucka
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Ballynamucka
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Ballynamucka is in the civil parish of Kilconickny.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Carrabane (Kilconickney, Kilconieran & Lickerrig)
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Kilconickny
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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