Information about Gortagowan

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Gortagowan
Irish Form of Name:
Gort a' gabhan
Translation:
field of the smith
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Gort a' gabhan
Gortagowan
Gurtagown B. S
Gortagowen Inq. Temp. Jac. I
Gurtagown Revd. R. P. Graham, Curate
Description:
Peter Blake, Esqr., proprietor. This townland contains 176 acres 158 of which are cultivated and 7 acres of wood. The remaining 11 acres are uncultivated. The tenants are at will. Rent 22s per acre. County Cess 21s per acre. Tythe 1s per do. The soil is light. The produce potatoes, corn, wheat and barley.
Situation:
Situated near the W. boundary of the parish, and in the S. W. corner of same, is bounded by Craiga[Unable to read.]lough, E. by Cappagh North and South, S. by Ganty, W. by Garraghloon North. Barony of Dunkellin.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Gortagowan in Galway, Kerry, and Tyrone ; Gort-a'-ghobhann, field of the gow or smith. See Gobha, vol. i. p. 222 [reproduced below].
In a state of society when war was regarded as the most noble of all professions, and before the invention of gunpowder, those who manufactured swords and spears were naturally looked upon as very important personages. In Ireland they were held in great estimation; and in the historical and legendary tales, we find the smith was often a powerful chieftain, who made arms for himself and his relations. We know that Vulcan was one of the most powerful of the Grecian gods, and the ancient Irish had their Goban, the Dedannan smith-god, who figures in many of the ancient romances. The land possessed by smiths, or the places where they resided, may in many cases be determined by the local names. Gobha [gow] is a smith, old Irish form goba; old Welsh gob, now gof; Cornish and Breton gof. The usual genitive form is gobhan [gown], but it is often the same as the nominative; and both forms are reproduced in names, the former being commonly made gowan or gown, and the latter gow. Both terminations are very common, and may be generally translated "of the smith," or if it be nagowan, "of the smiths." Ballygowan, Ballygow, and Ballingowan, the town of the smith, are the names of numerous places through the four provinces; and there are several townlands in Ulster and Munster called Ballynagowan, the town of the smiths. Occasionally the Irish genitive plural is made goibne, which in the west of Ireland is anglicised guivnia, givna, etc.; as in Carrownaguivna and Ardgivna, Sligo, the quarter-land, and the height, of the smiths. Sometimes the genitive singular is made goe or go in English; as we find in Athgoe near Newcastle in Dublin, the smith's ford; Kinego in Tyrone and Donegal, the smith's head or hill (ceann); Ednego near Dromore in Down, the hill-brow (eudan) of the smith. It takes a different form in Clongowes in Kildare, the smith's meadow, where there is now a Roman Catholic college - the same name as Cloongown in Cork.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
76 0 25
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
32 7 7
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
32 7 7
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Gortagowan is a townland.

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
(Click on place name to view original map in new window.):
Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
(This information will display in a new window.)
Gortagowan
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
(Click on place name to view original map in new window.)
Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
(This information will display in a new window.)
Gortagowan
Information from the Down Survey Website.
(This information will display in a new window.):
The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
(This website will display in a new window.)
Information from Google Maps.
(This information will display in a new window.):
You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
(This website will display in a new window.)
Information from the National Monuments Service.
(This information will display in a new window.):
You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Gortagowan is in the civil parish of Kilconierin.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Carrabane (Kilconickney, Kilconieran & Lickerrig)
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Kilconierin
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
(This information will display in a new window.):