Information about Glenaruid

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Glenaruid
Irish Form of Name:
Gleann a ruid
Translation:
valley of the mire
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Glenaruid
Gleann a ruid
Gleann Airid
Glannarrid By. S. Sketch Map
Description:
The property of Thos. B. Martin Esq. of Ballinahinch Castle.
Situation:
In the S. end of the Parish, bounded on the S. by the sea, on the E. by Kylesallgh, on the S. by Kilkerrin, on the N. and W. by Shannawirra and Letterpibrum.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Glenaruid in Galway ; glen of the rud or red iron-scum or mire. See vol. ii. p. 371 [reproduced below].
Iron scum. When the soil is impregnated with iron, water springing from the ground or flowing along the surface deposits a reddish mud; which also sometimes floats on the top and forms a thin, shining, metalliferous-looking scum. This rusty-looking mud or scum is sometimes used in colouring cloth, and it is known in most parts of Ireland - or was known when Irish was spoken - by the name of rod or ruide [ridda]. It got this name from its colour; for rod signifies red. This word is given in the old form rot, in Cormac's Glossary, where it stated that it signifies "everything red." It is of course cognate with Eng. red and ruddy. The word is pretty common in names, and it is easily known, for it is never much disguised by corruption. It is anglicised rud, rudda, ruddy, riddia, etc., all which forms are illustrated in the following names. Near the village of Ballyconnell in Cavan, is a lake remarkable for this kind of deposit, called Lough Rud; and there is a small pool called Lough Arudda in the county Leitrim, one mile from the north-western end of upper Lough Macnean. Moneyrod the shrubbery (or perhaps the bog) of the iron scum, is the name of a place in the parish of Duneane in Antrim; Corrarod in Cavan (cor, a round hill); Boolinrudda at the northern base of Slievecallan mountain in Clare (booly, a dairy place). Raruddy, with its old castle ruins, near Loughrea, and Cloonriddia in the parish of Killererin, both in Galway, the rath or fort, and the meadow, of the scum; the latter the same as Clonrud near Abbeyleix in Queen's County. In Bunnaruddee (bun, the end, the mouth of a stream) near Ballylongford in Kerry, there is a spa; and all the land round it is (as a person once described it to me) "covered with shiny stuff." The final g belonging to the adjective form appears - after the manner of the extreme south - in Kealariddig in the parish of Kilcrohane, west of Kenmare in Kerry - the keal or narrow marshy stream of the iron scum.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
550 0 25
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
10 7 6
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
0 0 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
10 7 6
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Glenaruid is a townland.
Other placesnames in this townland:
Some other placenames in or near this townland are...

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Glenaruid
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Glenaruid
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Glenaruid is in the civil parish of Moyrus.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Carna
  • Roundstone
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Roundstone, Moyrus and Beauchamp
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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